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§ 225.4 Additional discovery.

(a) Requests for additional discovery. Any party may request additional discovery within the deadlines set forth in the scheduling order.

(1) Allowable discovery. Except for the standard discovery provided in this part, any additional discovery requested must be narrowly tailored to the issues at hand, not covered by the standard discovery set forth in this part, highly likely to lead to the production of information relevant to the core issues of the matter, and not result in an undue burden on the party responding to the request.

(2) Standard for additional discovery. The Board will grant a request for additional discovery upon a showing of good cause. In considering a request for additional discovery, the Board shall balance the needs and circumstances of the case against the burden of additional discovery on any party, along with the amount in dispute and the overall goal of efficient resolution of the proceeding.

(3) Consent from parties. Prior to filing a request for additional discovery, the requesting party should make reasonable efforts to secure the consent of, or a compromise with, the other party regarding the proposed additional discovery request.

(4) Form of request. Requests for additional discovery and any responses thereto shall follow the procedures set forth in § 220.5(a)(2) of this subchapter. Unless otherwise specified in this section, a request for additional discovery must -

(i) Specifically indicate the type of additional discovery requested and the information sought, including the specific requests themselves;

(ii) Set forth in detail the need for the request; and

(iii) Indicate whether the other parties consent or object to the request.

(b) Requests for expert witnesses. An expert witness may be used in a proceeding only with leave of the Board. The use of expert witnesses in proceedings before the Board is highly disfavored and requests shall be rarely granted.

(1) Standard for permitting expert witnesses. The Board shall grant a request by a party to introduce an expert witness only in exceptional circumstances and upon a showing that the case cannot fairly proceed without the use of the expert. In considering a request for an expert witness, the Board shall balance the needs and circumstances of the case, and whether the request is made by one party or jointly among the parties, against the burden that permitting the expert testimony would impose on any other party, the costs to the opposing party of retaining a rebuttal witness, the amount in dispute, and the overall goal of efficient resolution of the proceeding. If the Board grants a request by a party to introduce an expert witness, an opposing party shall have the opportunity to introduce a rebuttal expert witness as a matter of course within an appropriate amount of time set by the Board. The Board will set a schedule for the service of the expert report and any rebuttal report and will adjust the dates in the existing scheduling order as needed.

(2) Form of request. Requests for an expert witness and any responses thereto shall follow the procedures set forth in § 220.5(a)(2) of this subchapter. The request must specifically indicate the topics of the expert's proposed testimony, the name of the proposed expert, and the anticipated cost of retaining the expert, and must set forth the basis and justifications for the request, and indicate whether the other parties consent or object to the request.

(3) Form of expert testimony. Any expert testimony permitted by the Board shall be submitted along with the offering party's written direct or response testimony in the form of an expert statement. An expert statement must -

(i) Be sworn under penalty of perjury by the expert witness;

(ii) Be organized into numbered paragraphs;

(iii) Be detailed as to the substance of the expert's opinion and the basis and reasons therefor;

(iv) Disclose the facts or data considered by the expert witness in forming the expert witness's opinions;

(v) Describe the expert witness's qualifications, including a list of all publications authored and speaking engagements in the previous 10 years;

(vi) Include a list of all other cases in which the expert witness testified as an expert at trial or by deposition during the previous four years; and

(vii) Include a statement of the compensation to be paid for the study and testimony in the case.

(4) Unauthorized expert testimony. Any expert testimony that is introduced in any way without the Board's express permission shall be stricken by the Board and shall not be considered in the Board's determination.

(c) Requests for admission. Requests for admission may be served in a proceeding only with leave of the Board. Requests for admission are disfavored and requests to serve requests for admission may only be granted at the Board's discretion upon a showing of good cause. A request to serve requests for admission, and any responses, shall follow the procedures set forth in paragraph (a) of this section.

(1) Subject matter. Requests for admission may pertain to:

(i) Facts, the application of law to fact, or opinions about either; and

(ii) The genuineness of any described documents, a copy of which must be attached to the request for admission.

(2) Form of requests for admission. Each matter must be separately stated in a request for admission in a numbered paragraph. Compound requests for admission shall not be permitted.

(3) Responses to requests for admission. A response to a request for admission must be served by the time specified by the Board. A matter admitted is conclusively established unless the Board, on request and for good cause shown, permits the admission to be withdrawn or amended. If a matter is not admitted, the answer must specifically deny it or state in detail why the responding party cannot truthfully admit or deny it. A denial must fairly respond to the substance of the matter, and when good faith requires that a party qualify an answer or deny only part of a matter, the answer must specify the part admitted and qualify or deny the rest. The responding party may assert lack of knowledge or information as a reason for failing to admit or deny only if the party states that it has made reasonable investigation and that the information it knows or can readily obtain is insufficient to enable it to admit or deny.

(4) Failure to respond. A matter is not automatically admitted if a party fails to respond to a request for admission within the required timeframe. However, the Board may deem it admitted in the Board's discretion subject to the Board's power to apply adverse inferences to discovery violations under 17 U.S.C. 1506(n)(3) according to the procedures set forth in § 225.5.

(d) Depositions. Depositions shall not be permitted in proceedings before the Board.


Source: GPO Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) (ecfr.gov)
Data current as of 08/11/2022