David Brunton
Senior Advisor for Organizational Policy and Special Projects


David Brunton is a senior advisor for organizational policy and special projects at the United States Copyright Office. He was appointed to the position in October 2019.

In his position, Brunton handles a wide portfolio of projects for the Register, including working to help plan and manage modernization projects, coordinating major IT-related projects, and collaborating on strategic planning for the Office. He serves as a liaison for the Register, keeping her apprised of the successes of projects and of any issues or concerns.

Brunton began his career with the Library of Congress in 2007 in the Office of Strategic Initiatives, working with the National Digital Newspaper Program. In that role, he served as the product manager for the website Chronicling America, a historical newspaper project jointly sponsored by the Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He was later promoted to supervisory IT specialist and then to chief of Repository Development.

Most recently, Brunton served as the chief of Platform Services, a division he helped to establish in the Office of the Chief Information Officer. Under his leadership, the division built the crowdsourcing platform crowd.loc.gov and developed the system used to acquire, preserve, and present hundreds of millions of items in the Library of Congress digital collections, among other accomplishments.

Prior to joining the Library, Brunton worked with various software startups for more than a decade. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University.

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About the USCO

Congress created the Copyright Office in 1897 as a separate department of the Library of Congress. The Register of Copyrights serves by appointment of, and under the general direction of, the Librarian of Congress. Congress enacted the first federal Copyright Act in 1790 in accordance with Article 1, section 8 of the United States Constitution, “to promote the progress of science and the useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective discoveries.”